An arduous road to Marolambo

An arduous road to Marolambo

We left Mahanoro for Marolambo at 10am last Saturday (20th June) in the back of a truck (cameon). We attempted sitting along the sides, gripping on the edges, but we were thrown from side to side due to poor road conditions and after 11 hours we were splayed out across the entire truck. Despite this, the journey was incredible with beautifulviews of the countryside and it was fascinating to get a glimpse of village life as we went further through the remote forest.

The team in the truck leaving Mahanoro.
The team in the truck leaving Mahanoro.

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The drive did not stop here. Just past the half-way point (approximately 50/60km from Mahanoro) we spent the night in small wooden shacks of a hotel that lined the road.
The journey continued the following day at 7am and the ‘road’ conditions became progressively worse. 12km away from Marolambo, we came to a stop because a truck in front had crashed into a ditch, blocking the track. We found several willing porters to help carry all extra bags and equipment and hiked the remainder of the way, finally arriving in Marolambo at 9pm Sunday evening, (only slightly battered and bruised from the journey, but all healthy, well and happy).

The road to Marolambo
The road to Marolambo

Marolambo is a very special town. Surprisingly, considering its remote area and very very arduous road, it is relatively large and developed – it has a church, Hotel de Ville, and busy market.

Several introductions filled the Monday. We met the head teacher of the main primary school in Marolambo (which has 743 pupils), who randomly assigned 80 children to participate in our study. Bellarmin, the head master and our Malagasy student counterparts introduced our project to the children. Embarrassed faces emerged like a Mexican wave and we could tell the children had learned that we wanted their pee and poo! 80 faecal pots were handed out but it left 10 extra young children in the room in tears. Our study group increased to a sample size of 90.

Embarrassed and giggling school children being told what the study involves!
Embarrassed and giggling school children being told what the study involves!
Madex team with the 90 school children who were screened for schistosomiasis in Marolambo.
Madex team with the 90 school children who were screened for schistosomiasis in Marolambo.

Next stop was to the CSB, with Le Medicine Inspecteur de Marolambo – the chief doctor of Marolambo. She expressed incredibly kind words of gratitude and blessed our team for our work and for the donation of the medical supplies.

A ten minute walk took us to the opposite end of the town to the director of education in the area where we decided upon the next 5 schools covering Marolambo and the two villages, Marofatsy and Betampina.

The priest has a beautiful wooden house surrounded by a very well kept garden. Much like a palace, the building is situated at the highest point in Marolambo and expresses great grandeur. There is a spare room here with two beds and the priest kindly offered this room for us to stay in. The facilities are equally impressive – a shower with warm water and toilet with a seat! We were very very happy!

Unfortunately for me, the following morning meant saying goodbye to this beautiful and peaceful town, and more upsettingly, to my team. A 9 seated plane landed smoothly on a concrete airstrip 30 minutes walk from the town. I spent the next 39 minutes at the front of this small jet talking to the Swiss pilot of Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) who takes Charitable and Christian groups to and from various remote locations across Madagascar. We both agreed that flying is the better option and will be our means of transport for any follow-up expeditions!

View of Marolambo from the air. If you look closely at the top left, you can see a line of 5 white dots. This is the team in the school playground wearing their labcoats.
View of Marolambo from the air. If you look closely at the top left, you can see a line of 5 white dots. This is the team in the school playground wearing their labcoats.

Since my arrival in Antananarivo I have spoken regularly to my team. They have screened two schools in Marolambo. The first school had a schistosomiasis prevalence of 86.9% and second 92.5%. I met with the ministry of health today who are shocked by the very high rates and will start arranging for mass drug administration to treat the town of Marolambo for schistosomiasis.

Needless to say I am devastated to leave at this stage but I am proud and happy of the work we are starting in Madagascar and that my team have settled well in Marolambo where they are safe and in good spirits.

Stephen

(Written by Stephen Spencer, Founder and Head of Madagascar Medical Expedition 2015)

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